Wednesday, June 17, 2009

Deer Grazing at Sunset/unfinished



"As painter....we must always remember that our precious poetic visions and spiritual insight will remain forever locked within us until we can boil them down to a complex arrangement of a few hundred strokes or possibly even thousands of brushstrokes." Richard Schmid

Inch by inch this one has been creeping out of the marble dust board. Plein air painting has the vision before you. From that image you make your own. In this painting I am working more like the way George Inness did. I saw the vision, but now it is just me and the board with nothing but the vision to guide me (unlike plein air). It's hard. Poetic visions,...hmmmmm, are supposed to appear easy, like they just slid off you like water on a duck's back ....... This one has been scrubbed, sprayed, scratched, painted, and hundreds of layers of pastel... It still has more to go. Let's see who wins.....or finds peace.
I swear it's the best job in the world.

8 comments:

Leah said...

I hope this one is still around for me to see when I get there! Counting down the days....

loriann said...

Can't wait to see you Leah!

Jill Berry said...

There is such a great light quality on the earth here, I can't say I miss the water.

brian eppley said...

Yes, enjoy the journey!

Donna T said...

I'd say you're really good at expressing your poetic vision in this one. I like that the deer aren't super-detailed. We're looking into the sun and they just kind of materialize after a moment. Beautiful!

loriann said...

Thanks Jill...it is hard to beat painting water, I agree with you. The only thing that comes close is a good field.

Brian....the journey is what we have. :-)

Donna, thanks...that is my intent I am glad it worked!

NJ ART 73 said...

Hi Lorian,
Plein air paintings feed the mind with information that can be recalled in the studio. It is a symbiotic relationship between the two. Of course one can paint landscapes w/o doing any outdoor studies Then again the mind does need to be refreshed otherwise an artist can either run into a brick wall or keep going in circles.When an artist paints outdoors or works in a sketchbook it creates a relationship betwwen the artist and the landscape.The act of seeing and looking at what is directly before you opens up your eyes to possibilities that were not there before. Taking even a few minutes in a sketchbook advances the quality of ones work. The end result is not important what does matter is that the eye & mind are engaged. It does not matter whether a "masterpiece' is produced working plein-air or something that is less than "perfect". What counts is the act of looking & thinking. I find that for myself the drawings that I have done outdoors, en plein air, are not referred to all that often. When painting I can recall what I need knowing that this "reference" material is there. The studies done outdoors are the fuel for what is done in the studio.

Annie said...

That was really a nice painting.

Vision Board