Wednesday, May 4, 2011

it's about the GREENS

12x12 oil on wood panel

I continue to experiment with underpaintings, texture and color combinations. As I stray from the "real" and move towards the feeling of the glow I am coming upon fascinating (for me) effects of simultaneaous contrast.
This oil (top) was created from an uninspiring plein air pastel (above). I decided in the studio that the concept was about GREEN, that baby soft green only found in the first moments of Spring. The remaining pink petals would need to be ignored. It would also be about the sun through the GREENS.
Next I decided best how to show off those baby GREENS and that decided the underpainting. I must admit this one was fun so far.
The journey continues....till tomorrow.

10 comments:

Maggie Latham said...

Loriann, I love this...sounds like you are having fun! Indian Yellow is a great warm yellow for glazing over blues, as is Winsor Yellow (alkyd oil W&N), as is cad Yellow and cad Lemon.....all work great as glazes with about 80% Liquin to paint. Prussian Blue by itself or mixed with white is amazing under a Yellow glaze...also goes kind of an ocean colour when mixed on the palette with Yellows. FUB goes baby blue when mixed with white.....but I'm sure you know all this (lol)....
Doing lots of colour chart and colour glazing in watercolour has really helped me be more experimental in my colours in oil. It's still hit and miss for me in oil....but I'm getting there!
Yellows are fascinating to me as there so many different warm and cool yellows which create different effects when used for glazing or mixed with white for scumbling. I always have been a 'shades of yellow' sky kind of painter.

Barbara said...

Loriann, love the top image. I've had a frustrating day of painting but it cheers me to see that you have had a good day!

Caroline said...

The top painting reminds me of a Wolf Khan, I think it is the way you are using colour in that you are laying colour not only over another but also side by side. When I visited a Monet exhibition in London many years ago I was amazed to see this effect. Also Van Gogh was a master of placing colours next to each other to get different visual effects. People think he was just a crazy artist yet there is some incredible planning and understanding of colour in his work.

B Boylan said...

The top one is really different than anything I have ever seen. Quite a fresh look with all those wonderful colors working together. Delicious eye candy...yumm!

Donna T said...

I love the oil painting too, Loriann! It's funny how we try so hard sometimes with our plein air work to get the colors "right" and then aren't happy with the results. Does that mean we want more at the time but don't know what we want or how to say it? :)

Lisa Le Quelenec said...

This looks so exciting! I love the energy and zing. Interesting to see the pastel that it came from. Happy painting!

jane minter said...

it sings lorraine

loriann said...

Hi Maggie, Yes, isn't it fun to experiment. I just found a new (to me) yellow from old holland, nickel titanum yellow- It's very neutral lemon yellow, but with no green in it. really nice. Enjoy your experiments!

loriann said...

Hi Barbara, sorry to hear about your frustrating day painting..i sure know about those as well!
I am glad to be able to cheer you up a little! Thanks about the painting.

Hi Caroline, Interesting observations! Vincent was an absolute genius..as is WK.

Hi Brenda, different indeed ..as I keep exploring underpainting and its relationship to the whole who knows what will happen!

loriann said...

Hi Donna, Plein air can be challenging for the reason you noted... getting it right is a funny thing.That's where memory comes in I think.

Thanks so much Lisa!

thank you Jane!