Thursday, February 11, 2010

monotype 1 and 2


 
3x5 monotype with pastel on BFK

 
                                           3x5 monotype with pastel on BFK

Recently Jala and I have been talking about monotypes. As far as printing methods go it's the best choice for a painter since it's so painterly. You don't have to have access to a press....No, all you need is a wooden spoon and a plate (copper printing plate that is.) So here a a couple of my first tries back at the plate.
Doing this makes me even more conscious of stroke and temperature. The monotype reduces everything even further, down to its bare elements. No sense getting lost in details, you won't see them. Color and stroke.

Of course where would we be without the snow report?
blizzard one-25 inches
blizzard two -maybe 20 inches(it's hard to tell the drifts are tremendous!)
That means if I don't have my skiis on the snow is up to my hips. During the second storm we only lost power for a couple of hours and were grateful for that! Thanks for all the well wishes everyone!

23 comments:

SamArtDog said...

Snow come down and up she rises!

Love (trying to not use that over-used word, but sometimes ya just have to!) these monotypes. Especially the 2nd. Been there seen that! Glad you sneaked in some pastel.

word verif.(honest): tophints

loriann said...

Hi Sam! You always slay me with your words! I look forward to your comments. Couldn't resist sneaking in the pastels...they needed softening... maybe I will try a more porous paper. oh and thank you!

Melinda said...

Wow. Love these. Snow is fabulous and you make it look so incredibly inviting!

I agree about monotypes. They can become quite addicting.

mariannepost said...

Loriann: These are really very intriguing. I have never ventured into doing monotypes, but you have peeked my interest. Stay warm and dry. You have had more than your share of winter. Makes me feel guilty, complaining when it gets below 50!

loriann said...

Hi Melinda,
You are right, snow is inviting and beautiful, albeit cold. It adds a whole new atmosphere. So you like monotypes too?

Hi Marianne,
Give it a try...just doing those two made me thing more about my stroke. I will do more. 50 sounds darn tropical at this point!The good news is we have heat...yipee!

brian eppley said...

These 2 pieces are stellar! Must be tough to have so many options. Your work continues to inspire! Hey, no snow for a couple days. Rejoice.

loriann said...

Thanks Brian! We have actually shoveled our way to pavement and the sun does shine again. Rejoice!

Tina Steele Lindsey said...

Loriann, I am so sorry. I have just now seen your comment on the blog I dedicated to my late father and his art. You posted a comment almost a year ago, and I would have responded had I seen it, so thank you so much. And I also love your work, it is very beautiful, soft, and calming. My best wishes to you, I hope your life is beautiful.

loriann said...

Hi Tina, Thanks for getting back to me....what a surprise! I was touched by your dedication to share your father's art after his passing. His warm spirit lives on and continues to touch more lives through his art (thanks to you.)Best wishes-Loriann

Casey Klahn said...

What a great thing to diverge towards monotype - I especially like the first one. And I want to send my props for all of the recent works, esp. the snowy and atmospheric one in the last post (before this one).

I would immediately think of Rives paper for this - I'm curious to see if you do another set on other paper. I have been using my stash of Rives BFK a lot lately.

Melinda said...

Yes, I really thought of myself as a printmaker for many years. I have an Ettan press that is very, very dear to me. I work 95% of the time on the press making monotypes, but also dearly love solarplates.

Because of blogging, though, painting has taken front row. But, one of these days.

I'd love to see more of your monotypes. Before I bought the press, I used an old wooden soup spoon...worked really well.

loriann said...

Thanks Casey! I have always used BFK when printing in the past, but that is when I had a press at my disposal.As soon as I am out and about (tomorrow I hope) I will go to the store and look for other, more porous options. I'll let you know.

Hi Melinda!
I didn't know you were a printer before. When studying for my BFA and MFA I did a ton of printing- lithography and monotype were my favorites. Montotype being the most inviting because so little of it was about the mechanical process. What kind of printmaking did you do?
A personal press!! Wow! Long ago I dreamed I would have one in the trunk of my car....who knows what will happen!

Jala Pfaff said...

Wow!!! I LOVE the top one. !!
I thought about trying it, but realized how freakin' messy it would be...and wimped out.
Can you also just use a flat piece of glass? That's what I was going to try. But then I realized I'd have to gesso some paper, and...wimped out.

Jala Pfaff said...

P.S. How long did you have to wait for the oil to dry before you put pastel on it? And what are these on--gessoed paper?

loriann said...

Hi Jala,
First thank you.
Second..it's easy and not messy at all. I see no reason why you can't use a piece of glass. Plex might be better. You will need to be careful when rubbing the edges because the spoon, if used hard enough, will cut through at the edges of the paper where the glass edge touches. My copper plate is slightly smoothed at the edges.
I did moisten my paper before printing.And no I did not gesso the paper. Never did do that before when I was in school. We were taught to use it straight.
In my constant state of impatience I did not wait for it to dry before using pastel. I think it helped the effect.
Trust me, it's really easy. Make it easy on yourself... you don't need it to last 300 years. (at least I don't..heehee)
Have fun! Loriann

Melinda said...

Hi Loriann,
Oh, I never got to lithography as I was too enamored of monotypes and solarplates. If you want to see any of my monotypes or solarprints, you can click on the slideshow on the upper right hand of my blog and it will take you to the picasa web album where I have quite a few. Or, just watching the slideshow brings them up.

The reason I bought the Ettan press is because it weighs only 90 lbs.--certainly feasible for one's trunk...
;)

loriann said...

Hi Melinda, I checked out your slide show..wow you have done it all! Maybe some day I too will get a press...later.Do you know any good asian type paper that will allow a nice bleed. I bought many different types...any recommendations? Happy painting and printing!

Melinda said...

Hi Loriann,
Thanks for checking out the slideshow. I'm sorry to say that right now, I can't remember the papers very well. I did love the Japanese papers and BFK Rives was always a good, serviceable paper. There were some lovely Hosho and Kitakata papers and a nice Mulberry is good. If I recall correctly, these had varying degrees of transparency.

Best wishes with more monotypes and pastels/oil!

loriann said...

Melinda, Thanks for the information! happy painting!

Brian McGurgan said...

Wow, Loriann, these are fantastic! So beautifully composed and such nice textures and color harmonies. I'm thinking maybe this is something I should try. So many possibilities... Thanks for the inspiration!

loriann said...

Thanks Brian. They are fun as long asI put no pressure on myself. Just play I tell myself. Do you have any paper suggestions? You are the "paper pro!" Then go enjoy some monotypes. Cheers!

Brian McGurgan said...

"Paper pro", huh? Yikes! I was thinking I would experiment with a few types of paper - maybe the smooth-ish Magnani Velata paper and Magnani's Pescia, which is a heavier weight and has an even but more pronounced texture similar to a firm, cold-press watercolor paper. I also have a pad of "Painters' Paper" from New York Central Art Supply that might work well. It is "latex impregnated" and made for use with oil paint, acrylics, oil pastel, etc. The surface is fairly smooth so I don't think it would take too much pastel over an oil monotype but it seems promising. I'll need to get a plate and will then give it a try. It seems like a very liberating way to work, with possibilities for all kinds of happy accidents that I normally wouldn't allow to happen when drawing.

loriann said...

Thanks for the paper info, my paper pro friend, Brian. I will check them out. Let me know if you try some monotypes...you are right about happy accidents. You just never know.