Saturday, October 2, 2010

chain bridge nocturne

oil on linen 8x10
So many artists have done beautiful nocturnes; Whistler, Remington and Inness, just to name a few. Then of course we have the contemporary blogger, Marc Hanson, who just finished his month long Nocturne Marathon. Please check out his amazing blog. You are in for a treat. Marc fills his blog with excellent information and beautiful paintings.
I am rising to the challenge. While I have observed many, painted a few, in oil and in pastel I know that I have alot to learn. Two things that seem to be true; cool light and much less color.
For this one I used a warm underpainting (after viewing the Whistlers) Then my love affair with color kindled..in earnest (below). Read too much color. 
Deborah Paris pointed out to me that it had too much color to be night. True.  The value shifts were right, but not the color. Now after a series of viridian, ultramarine blue, burnt sienna, and chromatic black glazes, it looks like night. I thought it also needed one lighter value in all the dark, which explains the brighter moonlight.

When puzzled I often change the mode in Photoshop (CS3) and that allows me to easily see the value. Remember value does the work, color gets the glory. I think I should simply write that on my hand each day...like a tattoo. I can't be reminded enough!
My goal is to learn that if color is to be exquisite, it needs to be controlled.

11 comments:

Double "D" said...

HI B!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I love the painting very much. I'm still puzzling over the color. It's probably just me but it still seems to be very warm. The finished value study is right on and appears to be a value darker in the sky. I don't know B, it's probably perfect and I like it so I guess it doesn't matter if it's warm or cool.

Well that was a garbled meanless paragraph.
pb

Lynne E. Windsor said...

Loriann, I can't help it, but I just love the black and whites! I did a whole series (will probably do more) of paintings, using just burnt sienna to lay out the image on a slightly stained panel. Then I left it to dry and glazed with transparent brown oxide, wiped out the light areas, left it to dry, added ultramarine blue deep, with a touch of b. sienna and transparent b. oxide, for more darks.. left it to dry... and on and on and they had this wonderful sepia, old photograph quality... sold all of them... hmmmm? why don't I do more!!! Thanks again for the interview. Going to post it now.

SamArtDog said...

I agree that Marc Hanson's nocturnal adventures have been remarkable. I expect yours will be as well.

I'm drawn to the exquisite color in this first one. No surprise. Btw, I keep going back to your ugly duckling. She gets prettier every time I see it.

loriann said...

You are right on PB, It is warm...even though the light is cool I could only make it cool to a point. I purposely allowed burnt sienna with its many cool glazes to show. I experimented with using only cool glazes on top of a warm underpainting. Success? No, but i am always learning and wondering.

loriann said...

Hi Lynne, That's a great idea... I will experiment with that. as for the interview, it was my pleasure. Hope you are enjoying being back in the UK. Someday i will come visit you:-)

Hi Sam, We are in agreement about Marc's nocturnes. I am happy do hear that you enjoy the duckling. If we look at her enough will she be a swan?

Caroline Bray Art said...

I love this nocture - I think your painting style suits the subject really well. The delicacy and softness work much better than a heavier application of oil paint, for example, or indeed alla prima oil painting. Not that I don't like Marc's works, I've been following them closely and thoroughly enjoying them. I just really appreciate the marriage of style and subject here, and the mood and mystery it creates. Well done, no ugly ducklings here...

loriann said...

Wow, thanks Caroline! I really appreciate your comment...believe me, it came at a good time! The softer application that glazing can make is completely different from alla prima application, which is the way I used to paint.( I really admire many alla prima painters, it's just I didn't like the way MY work looked.) You noticing that one thing makes me feel that maybe, just maybe one thing is working...a little.

Nika said...

ooh, I like the direction it's taken. Transparent, soft and soulful, very interesting. It just needs a little more push and pull here and there, but I feel you're very close.
I don't know about ugly ducklings, you've got to love them all. Sometimes when you're in between stages, the finished product doesn't look like you want it to, neither here nor there. But that's precisely because you're learning from it. That's actually a sign that you're not going back to a bag of tricks you already know how to use. I admire what you're doing, don't stop!

Caroline Bray Art said...

It IS working. Trust me...you probably just can't see it that clearly because you're too involved and working on these pieces everyday. If you take a step back, you'll see...I think you're onto something :)

loriann said...

Hi Nika,
No bag o' tricks here...always wondering, half lost, exploring. But that's the part I like, believe it or not. When it works I am amazed, when it doesn't I try not to get too bummed.

loriann said...

Wow thanks Caroline. I appreciate your words of support! (and your opinion!)